PCAH2022 Overview


Join us in Paris (and online) for PCAH2022!

June 16-19, 2022 | La Maison de la Chimie, Paris, France

The-Paris-Conference-on-Education-PCE2022-Eiffel-TowerBienvenue à Paris!

Paris has always been a city driven by strident ideas, where discussions and debates are lively, open and frequently heated, overspilling into protests, strikes and even revolution. As such, the French capital is among the world’s most important cultural and intellectual centers, and a city of great history and energy.

“Liberty, equality and fraternity” was the 18th century revolutionary call to arms and battle cry that was soon adopted and institutionalised, as the driving motto behind a new country that would throw off the shackles of absolutist aristocratic rule and commit to a new future for the country, based on enlightenment ideals and new understandings. These would have enormous ramifications within France and beyond as the concepts of liberty, equality and fraternity have spread around the world as a slogan, philosophy, aesthetic and political goal. During this period of revolution violence and competing ideologies, radical ideas and ideals around meritocracy and democracy emerged and were implemented in ways that still influence today, from the study, practice and policies of education, and the heuristic that education is for all, to artistic, design, and cultural production.

Over the course of its history, Paris has been the venue for real and intellectual battles over ideas, ideals and ideologies; between conservative and reformist, secular and religious, multicultural and national, East and West, and all shades of left and right. The French educational system and its fiercely independent, highly vocal, and hugely influential teachers and lecturers are always at the centre of national and indeed international politics and policy. Added to this vigorous public intellectual arena are politicians, writers, journalists, artists, and filmmakers, each bringing a wide variety of perspectives and experience.

What resonates globally, and in this time of globalisation is the openness and rigour of the debates in Paris, and which underlines the continued relevance of this open intellectual space, when in many other places around the world ideas are stifled or banned, any form of opposition is dangerous, and open discussion can be seditious. Paris, city of light, therefore has an enormous and special intellectual place in the heart of all educators and free thinkers regardless of nationality, and especially in today’s uncertain global social-political context.


New Revolutions

As the world recovers from the huge disruptions wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic, we have been forced to undergo a period of revolution in the ways in which we engage as professors and students, and teachers and learners. The pandemic has shown that the notions of freedom, equality and fraternity have been brutally called into question by curfews, school or university closures, travel restrictions, and lockdowns. This highlighted and exacerbated the digital divide, where rich countries were able to innovate solutions thanks to solid and reliable technological infrastructure, enabling communication both within and between countries, but also raising worrying questions about the power and reach of government and private enterprise reliance and surveillance. The deep and lasting impact on our expectations and our practices in terms of communication and education is only beginning to be understood, as are the benefits, limitations, and dangers of technology.


Welcome back. We’ve missed you.

We meet in Paris, as countless scholars have done in difficult times before, to consider the future and the education of future generations with apprehension, but also with great hope. We come together as educators and colleagues, as researchers and friends, and with the goal of breathing new life into the global and international academic community that is IAFOR.

Human contact, interaction and communication is what drives us, and for many of us over the past couple of years, we have been unable to meet our colleagues, students, teachers, collaborators and even family.

We look forward to seeing you again, and to your active participation in the event.

PCAH2022 will be held alongside The Paris Conference on Education (PCE2022). Registration for either conference will allow delegates to attend sessions in the other.

– The PCAH/PCE2022 Organising Committee

Grant Black | Chuo University, Japan
Steve Cornwell | IAFOR & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan
Georges Depeyrot | French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France
Joseph Haldane | IAFOR, Japan
Donald Hall | Rochester University, United States
Barbara Lockee | Virginia Tech, United States
Ljiljana Markovic | University of Belgrade, Serbia
Haruko Satoh | Osaka University, Japan
Krisna Uk | Association for Asian Studies (AAS)

Key Information
  • Venue & Location: La Maison de la Chimie, Paris, France
  • Dates: Thursday, June 16, 2022 ​to Sunday, June 19, 2022
  • Early Bird Abstract Submission Deadline: January 19, 2022*
  • Final Abstract Submission Deadline: April 01, 2022
  • Registration Deadline for Presenters: April 29, 2022

*Submit early to take advantage of the discounted registration rates. Learn more about our registration options.

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Speakers

  • Jared Baxter
    Jared Baxter
    Independent Researcher, United States
  • Georges Depeyrot
    Georges Depeyrot
    French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France
  • Tim Gore
    Tim Gore
    University of London Institute in Paris, France
  • Guido Gryseels
    Guido Gryseels
    Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA), Belgium
  • Judith Lehmann
    Judith Lehmann
    Helmholtz Centre Hereon, Germany
  • Anne Liskenne
    Anne Liskenne
    La Grande Chancellerie de la Légion d’Honneur, France
  • Marie Mawad
    Marie Mawad
    Sciences Po, France
  • Harald A. Mieg
    Harald A. Mieg
    Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany
  • Josette Rivallain
    Josette Rivallain
    Société française d’histoire des outre-mers (SFHOM), France

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Programme

  • Knowledge sans Frontières
    Knowledge sans Frontières
    Keynote Presentation: Tim Gore, University of London Institute in Paris, France
  • Undergraduate Research: Nurturing the Next Generation
    Undergraduate Research: Nurturing the Next Generation
    Panel Presentation: Judith Lehmann & Harald A. Mieg
  • From Nazi Spoliations to Ongoing Restitutions in the 21st Century, an Official French Cultural Point of View
    From Nazi Spoliations to Ongoing Restitutions in the 21st Century, an Official French Cultural Point of View
    Keynote Presentation: Anne Liskenne
  • Restitution of African Cultural Heritage and Its Challenges
    Restitution of African Cultural Heritage and Its Challenges
    Keynote Presentation: Guido Gryseels
  • Vincent van Gogh and the Allegory of the Road
    Vincent van Gogh and the Allegory of the Road
    Featured Presentation: Jared Baxter
  • Whose Heritage? Reconsidering the Museum as a Global Commons
    Whose Heritage? Reconsidering the Museum as a Global Commons
    Panel Presentation: Anne Liskenne & Guido Gryseels

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Organising Committee

The Organising Committee of The Paris Conference on Arts & Humanities (PCAH) is composed of distinguished academics who are experts in their fields. Organising Committee members may also be members of IAFOR's International Academic Advisory Board. The Organising Committee is responsible for nominating and vetting Keynote and Featured Speakers; developing the conference programme, including special workshops, panels, targeted sessions, and so forth; event outreach and promotion; recommending and attracting future Organising Committee members; working with IAFOR to select PhD students and early career academics for IAFOR-funded grants and scholarships; and overseeing the reviewing of abstracts submitted to the conference.

  • Grant Black
    Grant Black
    Chuo University, Japan
  • Steve Cornwell
    Steve Cornwell
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan
  • Georges Depeyrot
    Georges Depeyrot
    French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France
  • Joseph Haldane
    Joseph Haldane
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
  • Donald E. Hall
    Donald E. Hall
    University of Rochester, USA
  • Barbara Lockee
    Barbara Lockee
    Virginia Tech, USA
  • Ljiljana Markovic
    Ljiljana Markovic
    University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Haruko Satoh
    Haruko Satoh
    Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), Osaka University, Japan
  • Krisna Uk
    Krisna Uk
    Association for Asian Studies (AAS)

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IAFOR Research Centre (IRC) – “Innovation and Value Initiative”

The IAFOR Research Centre (IRC) is housed within Osaka University’s School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), and in June 2018 the IRC began an ambitious new “Innovation and Value Initiative”. Officially launched at the United Nations in a special UN-IAFOR Collaborative Session, the initiative seeks to bring together the best in interdisciplinary research around the concept of value, on how value can be recognised, and measured, and how this can help us address issues and solve problems, from the local to the global.

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Jared Baxter
Independent Researcher, United States

Biography

Jared Baxter is an independent researcher living in Washougal, Washington, USA. Over the last six years, his research has focused on Vincent van Gogh, in particular, how Vincent's enduring embrace of Christianity manifested itself in his later life and artwork. His research has been published in the January, 2014 Art History Supplement, and the July, 2014 Anistoriton Journal of History, Archaeology and Art History. Numerous mainstream outlets have also commented on his work including The Huffington Post, ArtNet News, The Siouxland Observer, and The Da Vinci Code author Dan Brown.

Mr Baxter has participated in several previous IAFOR conferences, including as a Featured Speaker at the 2015 & 2021 Asian Conference on Arts & Humanities (ACAH) and as the Keynote Speaker at the 2019 European Conference on Arts & Humanities (ECAH). He has accepted invitations to other academic conferences, including the 2015 Dutch Association of Aesthetics and the 2016 International Conference on The Arts in Society. He is currently filming a documentary, learn more at www.jaredbaxter.com.

Featured Presentation (2022): Vincent van Gogh and the Allegory of the Road
Georges Depeyrot
French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France

Biography

Georges Depeyrot is a monetary historian at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Paris. He began his scientific career in the 1970s studying coin finds and joined the CNRS in 1982. After some years he joined the Center for Historical Research in the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS) and is now a professor at the École Normale Supérieure. After his habilitation (1992), he specialised in international cooperative programs that aim to reconsider monetary history in a global approach. He has directed many cooperative programs linking several European countries, including those situated at the continent’s outer borders (Georgia, Armenia, Russia, and Morocco). Professor Depeyrot is the author or co-author of more than one hundred volumes, and is the founding director of the Moneta publishing house, the most important collection of books on the topic of money. Professor Depeyrot is a member of the board of trustees of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique.

Tim Gore
University of London Institute in Paris, France

Biography

Tim Gore is Chief Executive Officer of the University of London Institute in Paris (ULIP). He has held senior leadership positions in career postings in France, UK, India, Jordan, Dubai, Singapore and Hong Kong with experience in higher education; cultural relations; diplomacy and commercial enterprise. He has worked closely with a range of government organisations in the countries he has served in receiving the OBE for his work in India-UK bilateral relations while he was leading the British Council’s education work in India. ULIP has been a part of Franco-British academic relations since the end of the 19th century and is in a unique position as a research-led British campus in France offering a range of UK degree programmes. Tim recently co-authored The Evolution of Transnational Education with Routledge publishers.

Guido Gryseels
Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA), Belgium

Biography

Guido Gryseels has been Director General of the Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA) since 2001. The RMCA is a federal scientific institute. It conducts research both in human and natural sciences, has a major program in development cooperation in 12 African countries and is active in information dissemination and projects to promote world citizenship. The AfricaMuseum has colonial origins but has been subject to a major renovation in 2018. In recent years, the AfricaMuseum has been in the middle of controversies surrounding the colonial past of Belgium and restitution issues.

Previously, Guido Gryseels was service chief on International Agricultural Research at the Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations in Rome, Italy. Between 1979 and 1987, he was a scientist and assistant to the Director General at the International Livestock Centre for Africa in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He has a PhD in Agricultural Economics from the University of Wageningen, Netherlands, and has graduate degrees from the Universities of Leuven, Belgium, and New England, Australia. Guido Gryseels has been chair of the European Ethnology Museums Directors Group. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of the Belgian Development Cooperation Agency Enabel and is chair of the Program Committee of Food and Business Research at the Netherlands Foundation for Scientific Research.

Keynote Presentation (2022) | Restitution of African Cultural Heritage and Its Challenges
Panel Presentation (2022) | Whose Heritage? Reconsidering the Museum as a Global Commons
Judith Lehmann
Helmholtz Centre Hereon, Germany

Biography

Judith Lehmann taught literature, cultural studies and philosophy of science, steered cross-faculty projects at various universities, directed the editorial department of a Swiss publishing house, and the Argentinian office of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). Currently she heads the international scholarship division at Heinrich Böll Foundation, Berlin.

Panel Presentation (2022) | Undergraduate Research: Nurturing the Next Generation
Anne Liskenne
La Grande Chancellerie de la Légion d’Honneur, France

Biography

Anne Liskenne has been the archivist of La Grande Chancellerie de la Légion d’Honneur since 2019. For almost ten years previously, she was the Head of Looted Art Archives at the French Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs. She made it possible for the public to get access to and make the most of the Finding Aids on the Internet fund. She has also participated in many work groups in France and Germany: the “Musées nationaux récupération” (2013-2015) within the French Ministry of Culture; the international Task Force “Schwabinger Kunstfund” created by Germany in 2013 to investigate on the origin of Cornelius Gurlitt’s collection; the reissue of Rose Valland’s book Front de l’art in 2014, which has been an essential work to help comprehend the Nazi plunder under the Occupation; and finally the publication of Hermann Goering’s collection catalog in 2015.

Keynote Presentation (2022) | From Nazi Spoliations to Ongoing Restitutions in the 21st Century, an Official French Cultural Point of View
Panel Presentation (2022) | Whose Heritage? Reconsidering the Museum as a Global Commons
Marie Mawad
Sciences Po, France

Biography

After graduating from HEC Montreal, La Sorbonne and the University Dauphine with degrees in finance and economics, Marie Mawad became a journalist. She has worked for almost 15 years in French and international media, including at Bloomberg and Reuters. Since 2019, she has devoted herself to the deployment of the Financial Times' new digital media, Sifted, as a journalist and strategy advisor. With dual French and Canadian nationality, she has taught at Sciences Po's School of Journalism since 2017.

Marie Mawad is specialised in the study of technological breakthroughs and in anticipating their economic, political and social impacts. The systemic analysis of innovation is one of her favourite topics and she regularly takes part in international conferences on the subject as well as juries of startup competitions.

Harald A. Mieg
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Biography

Harald A. Mieg is (honorary) professor of Metropolitan Studies and Innovation at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and also affiliated to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich. The focus of his research is on planning processes in cities, research methodologies, and inquiry-based learning. Main book publications: "The Social Psychology of Expertise" (2001) and "The Cambridge Handbook of Undergraduate Research" (2022).

Panel Presentation (2022) | Undergraduate Research: Nurturing the Next Generation
Josette Rivallain
Société française d’histoire des outre-mers (SFHOM), France

Biography

Josette Rivallain is currently a lecturer at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, and a historian and archaeologist specialising in ethnoarchaeology. She also collaborates with a number of French museums in the archiving of collections of African ethnology, and the associated publications.

Dr Rivallain's research is on the comparative study of pre-monetary phenomena in European protohistory, and African ethnoarchaeology, and she holds a doctorate in history. Her thesis was titled "A Comparative Study of Pre-monetary Phenomena in European Protohistory and in African Ethnology".

Dr Rivallain taught at three different African universities from 1971 to 1984, and is currently involved with several scientific programs in Africa, including surveys of coastal sites in Benin and the Ivory Coast, and on the crafts of Benin, notably pottery, calabash, and basketry.

Knowledge sans Frontières
Keynote Presentation: Tim Gore, University of London Institute in Paris, France

The global knowledge community can be justifiably proud of some of the achievements of the last few years. Vast undertakings have attempted to grapple with knotty problems that do not respect national boundaries. Two prominent examples are the work on understanding and combating both climate change and COVID-19. Universities and their knowledge communities are crucial actors in this space and how successfully they engage in such globalised undertakings will affect us all.

Universities are unique institutions with remarkable longevity, their origins date back many thousands of years. Universities pride themselves on global engagement and their ability to cross frontiers. However, they are not global institutions in themselves as they remain tied in complex ways within national boundaries and preoccupations and are themselves buffeted by forces and challenges that are difficult to navigate. What are the challenges and opportunities facing universities and their epistemic communities? How can they better address the building and sharing of knowledge that benefits global development and all of society?

This talk looks at the nature of universities and their international strategic approaches; it considers how knowledge is created and shared through research and higher learning and teaching but also how it is threatened by events in the environment surrounding them and their own strategic or ad hoc decisions. Some ways forward and promising developments will be considered.

Read presenter biographies
Undergraduate Research: Nurturing the Next Generation
Panel Presentation: Judith Lehmann & Harald A. Mieg

In conjunction with the recent release of The Cambridge Handbook of Undergraduate Research, IAFOR is delighted to host an exclusive panel discussion with the editors Judith Lehmann of the Helmholtz Centre Hereon, and Harald A. Mieg, (honorary) professor of Metropolitan Studies and Innovation at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin along with several Europe-based chapter authors. The panel discussion, titled ‘Undergraduate Research: Nurturing the Next Generation’, will be led by Grant Black, an IAFOR VP, associate professor at Chuo University in Tokyo, Japan and a co-author of the Japan chapter of the book. Their discussion will explore current issues in the development of undergraduate research for the next generation in Europe with attention to both theory and practice in various academic disciplines. The interview will be followed by a Q&A session.

Read presenter biographies
From Nazi Spoliations to Ongoing Restitutions in the 21st Century, an Official French Cultural Point of View
Keynote Presentation: Anne Liskenne

From June 1940, the Germans occupied Paris and the whole of France in 1942. They immediately looted cultural goods - works of art, books and archives - belonging to Jewish families, galleries, Freemason associations and French services, and sent them to Germany, the main depot being in Bavaria.

In May 1945, Germany surrendered unconditionally. From this year onward, the entire restitution policy implemented by the Allied governments of the Western bloc has been based on the “London Inter-Allied Declaration Against Acts of Dispossession committed in Territories under Enemy Occupation or Control” of January 1943. In France, several services were shortly created to recover more than 100,000 looted works of art and more than 10 million books.

But in this terrible disorder, with the dispersion of hundreds of thousands of individuals, how was it possible to identify their owners? For art dealers, governments and museums, this question is still open. In an ever-changing international context, the cooperation between governments has helped the provenance research. I shall present from an official cultural perspective how this work can be done nowadays.

Read presenter's biography

Image caption: German soldiers of the Hermann Göring Division posing in front of Palazzo Venezia in Rome in 1944 with a picture taken from the Biblioteca del Museo Nazionale di Napoli before the Allied forces' arrival in the city.

Restitution of African Cultural Heritage and Its Challenges
Keynote Presentation: Guido Gryseels

The Royal Museum for Central Africa (AfricaMuseum) was established in 1898 as a colonial institute by King Leopold II. From the start, it was both a museum and a multidisciplinary research institute. The permanent exhibition of the museum remained unchanged from 1956 until the beginning of the 21st century. The AfricaMuseum was, until its renovation, often labelled as the last colonial museum in the world. In 2013 the AfricaMuseum embarked on a major renovation program that ended in a new permanent exhibition and a renewal of its infrastructure. The new permanent exhibition focuses on contemporary Africa, has a very critical view of the colonial past of Belgium, focuses on themes with a direct link to sustainable development and puts the African voice as central in the exhibition. In developing the new exhibition, the inputs of African experts, members of the African diaspora in Belgium, were very important. The renovation program also included the renewal of the museum’s infrastructure with a doubling of spaces for the public, the construction of a new entrance pavilion with conference facilities, and a total renovation of the museum building. The AfricaMuseum was closed between 2013 and its reopening on December 9, 2018. In its first year, it received nearly 400,000 visitors and more than 800 journalists from 45 different countries. Since the reopening of the museum, the Belgian society has given major attention to issues related to the colonial past, leading to the creation of a special parliamentary commission on the colonial past and reconciliation. The AfricaMuseum has one of the largest ethnographical collections of African cultural heritage and is therefore also in the centre of the debate on restitution issues. The AfricaMuseum has large and diverse collections of African cultural and natural heritage, such as 128,000 ethnographic objects, 10 million zoological specimens, 4 km of archives, 80,000 tropical wood samples, and 15,000 rocks and minerals.

An overview will also be given on current approaches on restitution in Belgium and other European countries.

Read presenter's biography
Vincent van Gogh and the Allegory of the Road
Featured Presentation: Jared Baxter

Paris, 1886 – Broke, Vincent van Gogh moves in with his younger brother Theo, a successful art gérant. Over the next two years, Vincent meets the Impressionists, their secular influences well-documented.

Vincent’s original stint as a Parisian denizen, however, came a decade earlier while being groomed for the role Theo would assume. Vincent’s last chance to prove himself a capable art dealer, he was too distracted and obsessed with the scriptures. He hoped, like his father, to spread the gospels; bringing consolation to the suffering. After five years with his uncle’s firm, Vincent was fired, admonished to never set foot in Goupils again.

Vincent retreated to London. On Sunday, October 29th, 1876, he delivered his first sermon at the Wesleyan Methodist Church. He borrowed heavily from John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress. The homily was impassioned with Vincent’s belief that we are all pilgrims on earth, on a long, upward road to reconnect with God. Today, art historians are fortunate that he recorded the entirety of those thoughts in a letter to Theo.

This presentation seeks to refine and redefine Vincent’s complicated Christology, exploring the allegory of the road in dozens of his later sketches, drawings and paintings; arguing, while his style and aesthetics constantly evolved over his ten-year career as an artist, Vincent’s desire to visually spread the gospels remained his raison d’être.

Image: Selection from Vincent van Gogh's Artist on the Road to Tarascon (1888)

Read presenter's biography
Whose Heritage? Reconsidering the Museum as a Global Commons
Panel Presentation: Anne Liskenne & Guido Gryseels

The modern museum is a product of a mania for collecting, cataloguing, documenting and archiving that reached its zenith during the nineteenth century, as the spoils of trade, conquest and colonisation began to pour back to the great European cities, and be housed in great palaces of culture and learning. Museums and galleries were places where the rich could show off with generous loans or donations as contributions towards the collective cultural wealth and prestige of the nation. These p(a)laces and their collections were recognized as of importance not just to the citizens of the countries, but to those overseas. Later this concept would be understood in the universalist language of world heritage.

Museums are unquestionably positive participants in the public good and in that of education and arts. However, how and what is presented is subject to increased questioning. A lot of what is now housed in museums is effectively the result of theft, plunder, or unfair contracts, or of dubious provenance. From colonial wars, through genocide and plunder, these great objects often hide problematic or dirty pasts. If this is the case, then what are the political, ethical and issues surrounding the righting of past wrongs, and of return of items, and how should their stories shape the positioning or works and our appreciation of them?

Read presenter biographies
Grant Black
Chuo University, Japan

Biography

Dr Grant Black is an associate professor in the Faculty of Commerce at Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan, where he has taught Global Skills and Global Issues since 2013. Grant is engaged in diverse roles as a global manager, systems builder, executive leader and university professor. His research and teaching areas include global management skills, intercultural intelligence (CQ) and organisational management. He also has taught Japanese Management Theory at J. F. Oberlin University (Japan), and a continuing education course in the Foundations of Japanese Zen Buddhism at Temple University Japan. Previously, he was Chair of the English Section at the Center for Education of Global Communication at the University of Tsukuba where he served in a six-year post in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. He holds a BA Highest Honors in Religious Studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara; an MA in Japanese Buddhist Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles; and a Doctor of Social Science (DSocSci) from the Department of Management in the School of Business at the University of Leicester. Dr Black is a Chartered Manager (CMgr), the highest status that can be achieved in the management profession in the UK. In 2018, he was elected a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute (FCMI) and Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA). Grant is President of Black Inc. Consulting (Japan), a business & university global strategic management firm based in Tokyo which helps individuals and organisations achieve their global targets. He is the director of the newly formed Nippon Academic Management Institute (NAMI) and the author of the forthcoming “Education Reform Policy at a Japanese Super Global University: Policy Translation, Migration and Mutation” (Routledge, 2021). He serves as a Vice-President and Auditor for the International Academic Forum (IAFOR).

Dr Grant Black is a Vice-President (at large) of IAFOR. He is a member of the Business & Economics section of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Steve Cornwell
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan

Biography

Steve Cornwell is the President of IAFOR, and President of the Academic Governing Board. He coordinates and oversees the International Academic Advisory Board, and also serves on the organization's Board of Directors.

Dr Cornwell is Professor of English and Interdisciplinary Studies at Osaka Jogakuin University, and also teaches in the online portion of the MA TESOL Programme for the New School in New York. He helped write and design several of the New School courses and has been involved with the programme since its inception.

He has also been involved with the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT), (an affiliate of IAFOR) serving on its National Board of Directors as Director of Programme from 2012-2016; where his duties involved working with a volunteer team of 50+ to put on JALT’s annual, international conference each autumn.

Most recently, since 2012, he has been the Committee Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s Lifelong Learning Committee and is responsible for their evening extension Programme geared towards alumni and community members. He is also the Vice-Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s English Education Committee which is responsible for suggesting policy regarding English Education and also responsible for developing material for the integrated curriculum.

Georges Depeyrot
French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France

Biography

Georges Depeyrot is a monetary historian at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Paris. He began his scientific career in the 1970s studying coin finds and joined the CNRS in 1982. After some years he joined the Center for Historical Research in the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS) and is now a professor at the École Normale Supérieure. After his habilitation (1992), he specialised in international cooperative programs that aim to reconsider monetary history in a global approach. He has directed many cooperative programs linking several European countries, including those situated at the continent’s outer borders (Georgia, Armenia, Russia, and Morocco). Professor Depeyrot is the author or co-author of more than one hundred volumes, and is the founding director of the Moneta publishing house, the most important collection of books on the topic of money. Professor Depeyrot is a member of the board of trustees of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique.

Joseph Haldane
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Biography

Joseph Haldane is the Chairman and CEO of IAFOR. He is responsible for devising strategy, setting policies, forging institutional partnerships, implementing projects, and overseeing the organisation’s business and academic operations, including research, publications and events.

Dr Haldane holds a PhD from the University of London in 19th-century French Studies, and has had full-time faculty positions at the University of Paris XII Paris-Est Créteil (France), Sciences Po Paris (France), and Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), as well as visiting positions at the French Press Institute in the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas (France), The School of Journalism at Sciences Po Paris (France), and the School of Journalism at Moscow State University (Russia).

Dr Haldane’s current research concentrates on post-war and contemporary politics and international affairs, and since 2015 he has been a Guest Professor at The Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, where he teaches on the postgraduate Global Governance Course, and Co-Director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre, an interdisciplinary think tank situated within Osaka University.

A Member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network for Global Governance, Dr Haldane is also a Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Philology at the University of Belgrade (Serbia), a Visiting Professor at the School of Business at Doshisha University (Japan), and a Member of the International Advisory Council of the Department of Educational Foundations at the College of Education of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (USA).

From 2012 to 2014, Dr Haldane served as Treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (Chubu Region) and he is currently a Trustee of the HOPE International Development Agency (Japan). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in 2012, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2015.

Donald E. Hall
University of Rochester, USA

Biography

Donald E. Hall is Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering at the University of Rochester, USA. Prior to moving to Rochester, he was Dean of Arts and Sciences at Lehigh University, USA. Dean Hall has published widely in the fields of British Studies, Gender Theory, Cultural Studies, and Professional Studies. Over the course of his career, he served as Jackson Distinguished Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English (and previously Chair of the Department of Foreign Languages) at West Virginia University. Before that, he was Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English at California State University, Northridge, where he taught for 13 years. He is a recipient of the University Distinguished Teaching Award at CSUN, was a visiting professor at the National University of Rwanda, was Lansdowne Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the University of Victoria (Canada), was Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Cultural Studies at Karl Franzens University in Graz, Austria, and was Fulbright Specialist at the University of Helsinki. He has also taught in Sweden, Romania, Hungary, and China. He served on numerous panels and committees for the Modern Language Association (MLA), including the Task Force on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion, and the Convention Program Committee. In 2012, he served as national President of the Association of Departments of English. From 2013-2017, he served on the Executive Council of the MLA.

His current and forthcoming work examines issues such as professional responsibility and academic community-building, the dialogics of social change and activist intellectualism, and the Victorian (and our continuing) interest in the deployment of instrumental agency over our social, vocational, and sexual selves. Among his many books and editions are the influential faculty development guides, The Academic Self and The Academic Community, both published by Ohio State University Press. Subjectivities and Reading Sexualities: Hermeneutic Theory and the Future of Queer Studies were both published by Routledge Press. Most recently he and Annamarie Jagose, of the University of Auckland, co-edited a volume titled The Routledge Queer Studies Reader. Though he is a full-time administrator, he continues to lecture worldwide on the value of a liberal arts education and the need for nurturing global competencies in students and interdisciplinary dialogue in and beyond the classroom.

Professor Donald E. Hall is a Vice-President of IAFOR. He is Chair of the Arts, Humanities, Media & Culture division of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Barbara Lockee
Virginia Tech, USA

Biography

Barbara Lockee is a professor of Instructional Design and Technology in the School of Education at Virginia Tech. Since 1996, she has engaged in teaching and research related to instructional design and distance education, and has advised the research of more than three dozen doctoral students. Her scholarly inquiry is focused on mediated and online education and has been funded by various federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Agency for International Development, among others. She has also consulted for a variety of organisations, including the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the US Army Training and Doctrine Command and the USC Institute for Creative Technologies. Her recent co-authored book, Streamlined ID: A Practical Guide for Instructional Design, strives to make the design of learning solutions accessible and pragmatic for those who develop educational courses and programs in workplace contexts.

Dr Lockee is Past President of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, an international professional organisation for educational technology researchers and practitioners. She earned her PhD in 1996 from Virginia Tech in Curriculum and Instruction (Instructional Technology), MA in 1991 from Appalachian State University in Curriculum and Instruction (Educational Media), and BA in 1986 from Appalachian State University in Communication Arts.

Ljiljana Markovic
University of Belgrade, Serbia

Biography

Dr Ljiljana Markovic is Dean, Chairperson of the Doctoral Studies Program and Full Professor in Japanese Studies at the University of Belgrade, Serbia. She has previously served as Vice Dean for Financial Affairs, Faculty of Philology, University of Belgrade (2008-2016). She holds the positions of Chairperson of the Association of Japanologists of Serbia, Member of the University of Belgrade Council, Chairperson of the University of Belgrade SYLFF Committee, Member of the Republic of Serbia, Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Bilingual Education Board, and Member of the Republic of Serbia, Ministry of Culture, Committee on Books Procurement for Public Libraries. In 2010 she received the Gaimu Daijin Sho Award from the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Japan, and in 2011 she received the Dositej Obradovic Award for Pedagogical Achievement. She is the author of a large number of publications in the fields of Japanese studies and economics.

Haruko Satoh
Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), Osaka University, Japan

Biography

Haruko Satoh is Specially Appointed Professor at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), where she teaches Japan’s relations with Asia and identity in international relations. She is also co-director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre and she was previously part of the MEXT Reinventing Japan project on “Peace and Human Security in Asia (PAHSA)” with six Southeast Asian and four Japanese universities.

In the past she has worked at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA), Chatham House, and Gaiko Forum. Her interests are primarily in state theory, Japanese nationalism and identity politics. Recent publications include: “China in Japan’s Nation-state Identity” in James DJ Brown & Jeff Kingston (eds) Japan’s Foreign Relations in Asia (Routledge, 2018); “Japan’s ‘Postmodern’ Possibility with China: A View from Kansai” in Lam Peng Er (ed), China-Japan Relations in the 21st Century (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017); “Rethinking Security in Japan: In Search of a Post-‘Postwar’ Narrative” in Jain & Lam (Eds.), Japan’s Strategic Challenges in a Changing Regional Environment (World Scientific, 2012); “Through the Looking-glass: China’s Rise as Seen from Japan”, (co-authored with Toshiya Hoshino), Journal of Asian Public Policy, 5(2), 181–198, (July 2012); “Post- 3.11 Japan: A Matter of Restoring Trust?”, ISPI Analysis No. 83 (December 2011); “Legitimacy Deficit in Japan: The Road to True Popular Sovereignty” in Kane, Loy & Patapan (Eds.), Political Legitimacy in Asia: New Leadership Challenges (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), “Japan: Re-engaging with China Meaningfully” in Tang, Li & Acharya (eds), Living with China: Regional States and China through Crises and Turning Points, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Professor Satoh is a member of IAFOR’s Academic Governing Board. She is Chair of the Politics, Law & International Relations section of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Krisna Uk
Association for Asian Studies (AAS)

Biography

Krisna Uk is the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) Senior Advisor to the Board of Directors, in charge of project development, outreach and strategic initiatives. Prior to joining the AAS, she was the Executive Director of the Center for Khmer Studies, designing and running programs focused on the history, politics and culture of Cambodia and neighbouring countries in Southeast Asia. Krisna studied at the University of California-Berkeley and holds a Masters degree in comparative literature from the University of Paris-Sorbonne and an MSc. in environmental change and management from Oxford. Her experience in Cambodia also includes overseeing landmine clearance programs and a period living in a remote village in the northeast of the country researching impacts of the Indochina War on ethnic minority communities. This formed the basis for her PhD in social anthropology at Cambridge University and subsequent book on the same topic.