PCAH2023

June 16-19, 2023 | La Maison de la Chimie, Paris, France

The 2nd Paris Conference on Education (PCE2023) and The 2nd Paris Conference on the Arts & Humanities (PCAH2023) were held between June 16-19 at the Maison de la Chimie in Paris. These concurrent conferences illuminated the intricate nexus between Education and Arts & Humanities, providing attendees a vibrant forum to delve into the pedagogical intricacies and the rich tapestry of human expression and understanding.

Reinforcing The International Academic Forum (IAFOR)'s commitment to the advancement of international, intercultural and interdisciplinary study, teaching and research, the iconic city brought together more than 400 delegates from 66 countries.

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Speakers

  • Bruce Brown
    Bruce Brown
    Royal College of Art, United Kingdom
  • Jeannie Cho Lee
    Jeannie Cho Lee
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
  • Georges Depeyrot
    Georges Depeyrot
    French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France
  • Donald E. Hall
    Donald E. Hall
    Binghamton University, USA
  • Jasper Morris
    Jasper Morris
    Inside Burgundy, United Kingdom
  • Daisuke Utagawa
    Daisuke Utagawa
    Daikaya, United States

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Programme

  • Things Matter
    Things Matter
    Keynote Presentation: Bruce Brown
  • Diplomatic Tables: Food, Wine, Politics and Culture
    Diplomatic Tables: Food, Wine, Politics and Culture
    Featured Panel Presentation: Jeannie Cho Lee, Jasper Morris, Daisuke Utagawa
  • There Is No New Normal
    There Is No New Normal
    Keynote Presentation: Donald E. Hall

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Bruce Brown
Royal College of Art, United Kingdom

Biography

Bruce Brown was educated at the Royal College of Art in London where he is currently Visiting Professor. Until 2016, Bruce was Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) and Professor of Design at the University of Brighton. For twenty years previously he was Dean of the university’s Faculty of Arts & Architecture. In 2018 Bruce was appointed by the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Specialist Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China to Chair the assessment panels for Visual Arts, Design, Creative Media in the Hong Kong Research Assessment Exercise 2020. Prior to this he was appointed by the UK Funding Councils to Chair Main Panel D in the 2014 UK Research Excellence Framework. Prior to this he chaired Main Panel O in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. Bruce served as a member of the Advisory Board of the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council and has advised international organisations including the Hong Kong Council for Academic Accreditation and the Qatar National Research Fund. Bruce chaired the Portuguese Government’s Fundação para a Ciência ea Tecnologia Research Grants Panel [Arts] and was one of four people invited by the Portuguese Government to conduct an international review entitled Reforming Arts and Culture Higher Education in Portugal. He has served as Trustee and Governor of organisations such as the Art’s Council for England’s South East Arts Board, the Ditchling Museum and Shenkar College of Design and Engineering, Tel Aviv. Bruce is an Editor of Design Issues Research Journal (MIT), an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Art and a Life Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

Keynote Presentation (2023) | TBA
Jeannie Cho Lee
Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Biography

Jeannie Cho Lee is the first Asian Master of Wine, an award-winning author of 3 books, wine judge, educator and consultant. She was awarded the Legion of Honor for her contributions to French gastronomy and wine in 2021 by the President of France. In 2015, Jeannie was selected as one of the top 100 most influential people in Hong Kong by the South China Morning Post and Debrett’s, and voted the 25th most powerful person in wine by Decanter magazine (UK). She is currently a professor at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University's School of Hotel and Tourism Management where she received a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in marketing and branding. Jeannie also holds a Master’s degree in Public Policy from Harvard University, a Bachelor of Arts degree from Smith College in Political Science/International Relations, and a Certificat de Cuisine from Cordon Bleu. She consults for several hospitality groups such as Resorts World Singapore and has been the wine consultant for Singapore Airlines since 2009.

Featured Panel Presentation (2023) | TBA
Georges Depeyrot
French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France

Biography

Georges Depeyrot is a monetary historian at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and the École Normale Supérieure (ENS) in Paris, France. He began his scientific career in the 1970s studying coin finds and joined the CNRS in 1982. He later joined the Center for Historical Research in the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS) and is now an emeritus research director and professor at ENS. After his habilitation (1992), he specialised in international cooperative programs that aim to reconsider monetary history in a global approach. He has directed many cooperative programs linking several European countries, including those situated at the continent’s outer borders, such asGeorgia, Armenia, Poland, Russia, Morocco, China, and Japan. Professor Depeyrot is the author or co-author of more than one hundred volumes, and is the founding director of the Moneta publishing house, the most important collection of books – around 210 volumes – on the topic of money. He is also the founding director of a collection of books on heritage. Professor Depeyrot was a member of the board of trustees of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique in Paris, France.

Donald E. Hall
Binghamton University, USA

Biography

Donald E. Hall is Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at Binghamton University (SUNY), USA. He was formerly Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering at the University of Rochester, USA, and held a previous position as Dean of Arts and Sciences at Lehigh University, USA. Provost Hall has published widely in the fields of British Studies, Gender Theory, Cultural Studies, and Professional Studies. Over the course of his career, he served as Jackson Distinguished Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English (and previously Chair of the Department of Foreign Languages) at West Virginia University. Before that, he was Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English at California State University, Northridge, where he taught for 13 years. He is a recipient of the University Distinguished Teaching Award at CSUN, was a visiting professor at the National University of Rwanda, was Lansdowne Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the University of Victoria (Canada), was Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Cultural Studies at Karl Franzens University in Graz, Austria, and was Fulbright Specialist at the University of Helsinki. He has also taught in Sweden, Romania, Hungary, and China. He served on numerous panels and committees for the Modern Language Association (MLA), including the Task Force on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion, and the Convention Program Committee. In 2012, he served as national President of the Association of Departments of English. From 2013-2017, he served on the Executive Council of the MLA.

His current and forthcoming work examines issues such as professional responsibility and academic community-building, the dialogics of social change and activist intellectualism, and the Victorian (and our continuing) interest in the deployment of instrumental agency over our social, vocational, and sexual selves. Among his many books and editions are the influential faculty development guides, The Academic Self and The Academic Community, both published by Ohio State University Press. Subjectivities and Reading Sexualities: Hermeneutic Theory and the Future of Queer Studies were both published by Routledge Press. Most recently he and Annamarie Jagose, of the University of Auckland, co-edited a volume titled The Routledge Queer Studies Reader. Though he is a full-time administrator, he continues to lecture worldwide on the value of a liberal arts education and the need for nurturing global competencies in students and interdisciplinary dialogue in and beyond the classroom.

Professor Donald E. Hall is a Vice-President of the IAFOR Academic Governing Board.

Jasper Morris
Inside Burgundy, United Kingdom

Biography

Jasper, a native of Hampshire, United Kingdom, preferred to immerse himself in the field of wine rather than follow the family occupation of law.

Having created his own importing company in 1981, Morris & Verdin Ltd, he became a specialist in the wines of Burgundy. He became a Master of Wine in 1985, bought a house near Beaune in 1991, and published his book Inside Burgundy in 2010 (second edition 2021). Both editions were awarded the André Simon prize.

Having sold his company to Berry Bros & Rudd in 2003, with whom he stayed until 2017, Jasper decided to leave the world of commerce so as to better understand what was going on in his favourite region and to find further ways to transmit this knowledge – hence the website Jasper Morris Inside Burgundy, www.insideburgundy.com.

Jasper, elected Chevalier de l’Ordre de Mérite Agricole in 2005, is also a consultant for the Hospices de Beaune wine auction since 2016, first with Christie’s and now with Sotheby’s.

Featured Panel Presentation (2023) | TBA
Daisuke Utagawa
Daikaya, United States

Biography

Born in Tokyo, Daisuke Utagawa first came to Washington, D.C. with his father in 1969 where he attended school in Bethesda, Maryland. Utagawa returned to Japan in 1972 to finish his education, and began an apprenticeship in 1980 where he learned the art of traditional Japanese culinary technique from a master chef. In 1983, Utagawa returned to D.C. and started working as a sushi chef at the original Sushiko before purchasing the restaurant in 1988. Utagawa has since spent many years studying the “Cuisine of Subtraction” and, as the Creative Director, applies what he’s learned to Sushiko’s entire experience. a a US citizen, Utagawa lives in D.C. with his wife and children and continues his work as a renowned restaurateur with Sushiko and his ramen shop and izakaya, Daikaya.

Featured Panel Presentation (2023) | TBA
Things Matter
Keynote Presentation: Bruce Brown

Material things matter. Without them we would not have the means to reify our abstract thoughts and experiences — to ‘anchor’ them in the physical world. But, in recent years, the ubiquitous presence of material things in our lives (but not their role or value) has come under fire. For many, the legacy of industrial manufacture and marketing has left us with a consumer culture that exploits the resources of our natural world in order to produce disposal goods of little value that soon end up in landfill. Perhaps, in response to this, a new generation of digital natives has sought to democratise the means by which virtual surrogates are produced and distributed—and, in the process, reduce toxic waste and damage to the environment. This presentation will consider the space between these two extremes and the intrinsic value of material things as essential elements in the fabric of our individual and collective lives.

Read presenter's biography
Diplomatic Tables: Food, Wine, Politics and Culture
Featured Panel Presentation: Jeannie Cho Lee, Jasper Morris, Daisuke Utagawa

Food and wine are boundary-traversing languages that shape our understanding of and relationship with the world. In the world of culinary diplomacy, France is a superpower, and exercises outsized influence, and in this panel, we will look at how France has played and continues to play an important role in educating, training and quality assurance, and how other countries engage around food, sometimes contentiously.

Like other forms of cultural diplomacy, culinary diplomacy requires skill and knowledge of chefs and food experts who communicate their own country’s history and culture through gastronomy. However, it is also at the level of “ordinary” people engaging around the food and drink that they love, and the personal vulnerability that exists in sharing their own “soul food”.

Food and drink are conduits that connect people and societies in ways conventional diplomacy between countries cannot. Whether as an ordinary tourist, or as a leader of a country, individuals taste and digest, both literally and metaphorically, the culture, history, and politics of other countries.

In this panel, three different professionals from three different nationalities, but with a shared love and professional interest in French cuisine and wine, talk about their relationship with food and wine, in this exciting international, intercultural and interdisciplinary space.

Read presenter biographies
There Is No New Normal
Keynote Presentation: Donald E. Hall

As we emerge from COVID and the requirements we all endured for masking, distancing, and curtailed travel, we have heard regularly that we have now entered a post-COVID "new normal." That term begs the question, of course, of what "old normal" is being referred to and how precisely we have deviated from it. It further obscures the fact that the queer theorist Michael Warner, in The Trouble with Normal from a quarter-century ago, rejected the whole notion of "normality," arguing that as a term, it has been used primarily as a means to assert control by dominant powers - normalising their interests - rather than to capture a widely common or desirable way of being.

So, was there in the years immediately pre-COVID a static and definable "normal" that then evolved radically into a "new" state over just 24 months or so? To put it bluntly, "no." The U.S.-based Pew Research Center has joined others in addressing this topic directly, concluding that our supposed "new normal" is really only an intensification of trends already present well before the pandemic: worsening social inequality, deepening mistrust of authority, science, and fact, and a turn toward authoritarianism as populations reject diversity, inclusion, and demands for social justice. Yes, we may have seen an appreciable uptick in remote work and online delivery of education, but even those simply meant more isolation and less immediate interaction with those unlike ourselves, and therefore worsened all of the social threats just mentioned.

To proclaim a "new normal" is at best a form of wishful thinking that a definitive break has occurred with a past that is viewed most often with nostalgia but at other times with distaste or condescension. It absolves us from reckoning with long-standing injustice and our own culpability in entrenched patterns of violence against the disenfranchised. It allows us to see ourselves and our quotidian lives as having endured something cataclysmic, emerging then phoenix-like, changed irrevocably. If we are living in the "new," then we no longer have to reckon with the "old," including long-standing and continuing crimes against others' selfhoods. The concept of a "new normal," in effect, absolves us of responsibility.

Instead of wasting time by celebrating or reviling a "new normal," we should work instead to document the trends that the pandemic magnified and trace down the intensified threats to civil society and economic security that have arisen because of or in response to the pandemic. This does not hinge on the concept of anything radically "new," rather it posits an incrementalist model of deepening fears of difference and desperate reassertions of old ideologies—a toxic, continuing normalisation of intolerance and indifference. As U.S. politicians wage renewed war on transgender youth and what they deride as "critical race theory" and "woke" culture, the old norms seem very much alive and all too present.